Windows程序设计(第5版・英文版)(套装上下册) (美国)Charles Petzold

Windows程序设计(第5版・英文版)(套装上下册)

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页数:1200
出版时间:2009年01月
新旧程度:二手旧书
作者:(美国)Charles Petzold
出版社:人民邮电出版社
ISBN:9787115193155

定   价:¥189
促销价:¥75.6

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出版社:人民邮电出版社
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页数:1200
IBSN:9787115193155
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出版时间:2009年01月
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书名:Windows程序设计(第5版・英文版)(套装上下册)
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Windows程序设计“圣经”,十年依旧畅销不衰的神品,传奇大师带你走入Windows编程圣殿
有经验的Windows程序员都知道,如果在工作中遇到了技术难题。最好的解决办法就是去查Petzold的书。是的,《Windows程序设计》内容博大精深。阐述透彻流畅,是毋庸置疑的Windows程序设计的权威著作,也是享誉世界的微软技术大师、Windows先驱奖得主Charles Petzold的代表作。多少年来,一代又一代Windows程序员受惠于《Windows程序设计》,无数在Windows上运行的程序都不同程度地受到了《Windows程序设计》的影响。
今天,Win32 API之上已经有了各种框架使我们的开发工作更加方便。但是Petzold著作的魅力不减。仍然在不断重印。原因很简单。正如一位读者说的,Win32 API依旧是Windows的基础。不经过《Windows程序设计》的洗礼,你很难说自己已经真正进入Windows程序设计技术的圣殿。
《Windows程序设计》分上下两册装订。本册讲述了Windows编程中较高级的主题。包括图形、打印机、声音和音乐、动态链接库、多任务和多线程、多文档界面等内容,为开发人员提供了更全面的编程指导。书中代码可以在图灵网站www.turingbook.com《Windows程序设计》网页免费注册下载。 “Windows程序设计最举足轻重的书当然就是Charles Petzold的Programming Windows。你还没有读过吗?晕,赶快去买一本!”
――Windows Tech Journal
“本书让你如入宝山,奇珍异宝俯拾皆是。我本人从中获益良多。”
――Andrew Schulman,著名技术作家,传奇著作Undocumented Windows作者

内容简介

《Windows程序设计》是Windows 程序设计方面不可替代的权威著作,由著名技术大师Charles Petzold 编写。书中涵盖了从基本输入输出、对话框、图形、内核、多线程、网络编程等Win32 程序设计的核心内容。
《Windows程序设计》是各层次Windows 程序员的必备参考书。
※ 相关资源
有经验的Windows程序员都知道,如果在工作中遇到了技术难题,最好的解决办法就是去查Petzold的书。是的,《Windows程序设计》内容博大精深,阐述透彻流畅,是毋庸置疑的Windows程序设计的权威著作,也是享誉世界的微软技术大师、Windows先驱奖得主Charles Petzold的代表作。多少年来,一代又一代Windows程序员受惠于《Windows程序设计》,无数在Windows上运行的程序都不同程度地受到了《Windows程序设计》的影响。
今天,Win32 API之上已经有了各种框架使我们的开发工作更加方便,但是Petzold著作的魅力不减,仍然在不断重印。原因很简单,正如一位读者说的,Win32 API依旧是Windows的基础,不经过《Wind

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目录
上册
Section I The Basics

Chapter 1 Getting Started 3
The Windows Environment 4
A History of Windows 4
Aspects of Windows 6
Dynamic Linking 8
Windows Programming Options 9
APIs and Memory Models 9
Language Options 10
The Programming Environment 11
API Documentation 12
Your First Windows Program 13
A Character-Mode Model 13
The Windows Equivalent 14
The Header Files 15
Program Entry Point 15
The MessageBox Function 16
Compile, Link, and Run 18

Chapter 2 An Introduction to Unicode 19
A Brief History of Character Sets 20
American Standards 20
The World Beyond 21
Extending ASCII 22
Double-Byte Character Sets 24
Unicode to the Rescue 25
Wide Characters and C 26
The char Data Type 26
Wider Characters 27
Wide-Character Library Functions 28
Maintaining a Single Source 29
Wide Characters and Windows 31
Windows Header File Types 31
The Windows Function Calls 33
Windows?String Functions 34
Using printf in Windows 34
A Formatting Message Box 37
Internationalization and This Book 38

Chapter 3 Windows and Messages 41
A Window of Ones Own 41
An Architectural Overview 42
The HELLOWIN Program 44
Thinking Globally 47
Registering the Window Class 51
Creating the Window 57
Displaying the Window 59
The Message Loop 60
The Window Procedure 62
Processing the Messages 62
Playing a Sound File 63
The WM_PAINT Message 64
The WM_DESTROY Message 66
The Windows Programming Hurdles 66
Don’t Call Me, I'll Call You 66
Queued and Nonqueued Messages 68
Get In and Out Fast 70

Chapter 4 An Exercise in Text Output 71
Painting and Repainting 72
The WM_PAINT Message 72
Valid and Invalid Rectangles 74
An Introduction to GDI 74
The Device Context 75
Getting a Device Context Handle: Method One 75
The Paint Information Structure 77
Getting a Device Context Handle: Method Two 79
TextOut: The Details 80
The System Font 82
The Size of a Character 82
Text Metrics: The Details 83
Formatting Text 85
Putting It All Together 86
The SYSMETS1.C Window Procedure 94
Not Enough Room 95
The Size of the Client Area 95
Scroll Bars 97
Scroll Bar Range and Position 99
Scroll Bar Messages 100
Scrolling SYSMETS 102
Structuring Your Program for Painting 107
Building a Better Scroll 108
The Scroll Bar Information Functions 108
How Low Can You Scroll? 110
The New SYSMETS 111
But I Don’t Like to Use the Mouse 118

Chapter 5 Basic Drawing 121
The Structure of GDI 121
The GDI Philosophy 121
The GDI Function Calls 123
The GDI Primitives 124
Other Stuff 125
The Device Context 126
Getting a Device Context Handle 126
Getting Device Context Information 128
The DEVCAPS1 Program 129
The Size of the Device 133
Finding Out About Color 138
The Device Context Attributes 140
Saving Device Contexts 142
Drawing Dots and Lines 143
Setting Pixels 143
Straight Lines 144
The Bounding Box Functions 149
Bezier Splines 156
Using Stock Pens 161
Creating, Selecting, and Deleting Pens 162
Filling in the Gaps 165
Drawing Modes 166
Drawing Filled Areas 168
The Polygon Function and the Polygon-Filling Mode 169
Brushing the Interior 174
The GDI Mapping Mode 176
Device Coordinates and Logical Coordinates 177
The Device Coordinate Systems 178
The Viewport and the Window 179
Working with MM_TEXT 181
The Metric Mapping Modes 183
The “Roll Your Own” Mapping Modes 187
The WHATSIZE Program 192
Rectangles, Regions, and Clipping 196
Working with Rectangles 196
Random Rectangles 198
Creating and Painting Regions 202
Clipping with Rectangles and Regions 204
The CLOVER Program 205

Chapter 6 The Keyboard 211
Keyboard Basics 211
Ignoring the Keyboard 212
Who's Got the Focus? 212
Queues and Synchronization 213
Keystrokes and Characters 214
Keystroke Messages 214
System and Nonsystem Keystrokes 215
Virtual Key Codes 216
The lParam Information 219
Shift States 221
Using Keystroke Messages 222
Enhancing SYSMETS for the Keyboard 223
Character Messages 231
The Four Character Messages 232
Message Ordering 233
Control Character Processing 234
Dead-Character Messages 235
Keyboard Messages and Character Sets 236
The KEYVIEW1 Program 236
The Foreign-Language Keyboard Problem 242
Character Sets and Fonts 244
What About Unicode? 255
TrueType and Big Fonts 256
The Caret (Not the Cursor) 263
The Caret Functions 264
The TYPER Program 265

Chapter 7 The Mouse 273
Mouse Basics 274
Some Quick Definitions 274
The Plural of Mouse Is?275
Client-Area Mouse Messages 276
Simple Mouse Processing: An Example 277
Processing Shift Keys 281
Mouse Double-Clicks 283
Nonclient-Area Mouse Messages 284
The Hit-Test Message 285
Messages Beget Messages 286
Hit-Testing in Your Programs 287
A Hypothetical Example 287
A Sample Program 288
Emulating the Mouse with the Keyboard 291
Add a Keyboard Interface to CHECKER 293
Using Child Windows for Hit-Testing 297
Child Windows in CHECKER 297
Child Windows and the Keyboard 303
Capturing the Mouse 309
Blocking Out a Rectangle 309
The Capture Solution 313
The BLOKOUT2 Program 314
The Mouse Wheel 318
Still to Come 326

Chapter 8 The Timer 327
Timer Basics 328
The System and the Timer 328
Timer Messages Are Not Asynchronous 329
Using the Timer: Three Methods 330
Method One 330
Method Two 334
Method Three 337
Using the Timer for a Clock 338
Building a Digital Clock 338
Getting the Current Time 343
Displaying Digits and Colons 344
Going International 344
Building an Analog Clock 346
Using the Timer for a Status Report 351

Chapter 9 Child Window Controls 357
The Button Class 359
Creating the Child Windows 363
The Child Talks to Its Parent 365
The Parent Talks to Its Child 366
Push Buttons 367
Check Boxes 368
Radio Buttons 369
Group Boxes 369
Changing the Button Text 369
Visible and Enabled Buttons 370
Buttons and Input Focus 370
Controls and Colors 371
System Colors 372
The Button Colors 373
The WM_CTLCOLORBTN Message 374
Owner-Draw Buttons 375
The Static Class 382
The Scroll Bar Class 383
The COLORS1 Program 384
The Automatic Keyboard Interface 392
Window Subclassing 393
Coloring the Background 393
Coloring the Scroll Bars and Static Text 394
The Edit Class 395
The Edit Class Styles 398
Edit Control Notification 399
Using the Edit Controls 399
Messages to an Edit Control 400
The Listbox Class 401
List Box Styles 401
Putting Strings in the List Box 402
Selecting and Extracting Entries 403
Receiving Messages from List Boxes 404
A Simple List Box Application 405
Listing Files 409
A head for Windows 411

Chapter 10 Menus and Other Resources 417
Icons, Cursors, Strings, and Custom Resources 418
Adding an Icon to a Program 418
Getting a Handle on Icons 424
Using Icons in Your Program 426
Using Customized Cursors 427
Character String Resources 428
Custom Resources 430
Menus 439
Menu Concepts 440
Menu Structure 440
Defining the Menu 441
Referencing the Menu in Your Program 441
Menus and Messages 442
A Sample Program 445
Menu Etiquette 451
Defining a Menu the Hard Way 452
Floating Popup Menus 453
Using the System Menu 459
Changing the Menu 462
Other Menu Commands 463
An Unorthodox Approach to Menus 464
Keyboard Accelerators 469
Why You Should Use Keyboard Accelerators 469
Some Rules on Assigning Accelerators 470
The Accelerator Table 470
Loading the Accelerator Table 471
Translating the Keystrokes 471
Receiving the Accelerator Messages 472
POPPAD with a Menu and Accelerators 473
Enabling Menu Items 480
Processing the Menu Options 480

Chapter 11 Dialog Boxes 483
Modal Dialog Boxes 484
Creating an “About” Dialog Box 484
The Dialog Box and Its Template 488
The Dialog Box Procedure 491
Invoking the Dialog Box 493
Variations on a Theme 494
A More Complex Dialog Box 497
Working with Dialog Box Controls 505
The OK and Cancel Buttons 507
Avoiding Global Variables 509
Tab Stops and Groups 510
Painting on the Dialog Box 512
Using Other Functions with Dialog Boxes 513
Defining Your Own Controls 513
Modeless Dialog Boxes 520
Differences Between Modal and Modeless Dialog Boxes 521
The New COLORS Program 523
HEXCALC: Window or Dialog Box? 529
The Common Dialog Boxes 538
POPPAD Revisited 538
Unicode File I/O 563
Changing the Font 564
Search and Replace 564
The One-Function-Call Windows Program 565

Chapter 12 The Clipboard 567
Simple Use of the Clipboard 568
The Standard Clipboard Data Formats 568
Memory Allocation 570
Transferring Text to the Clipboard 572
Getting Text from the Clipboard 573
Opening and Closing the Clipboard 574
The Clipboard and Unicode 575
Beyond Simple Clipboard Use 581
Using Multiple Data Items 581
Delayed Rendering 583
Private Data Formats 584
Becoming a Clipboard Viewer 587
The Clipboard Viewer Chain 587
Clipboard Viewer Functions and Messages 587
A Simple Clipboard Viewer 590

下册

Section II More Graphics

Chapter 13 Using the Printer 597
Printing Fundamentals 598
Printing and Spooling 598
The Printer Device Context 602
The Revised DEVCAPS Program 605
The PrinterProperties Call 615
Checking for BitBlt Capability 616
The Simplest Printing Program 617
Printing Graphics and Text 619
Bare-Bones Printing 622
Canceling Printing with an Abort Procedure 623
How Windows Uses AbortProc 625
Implementing an Abort Procedure 625
Adding a Printing Dialog Box 628
Adding Printing to POPPAD 633

Chapter 14 Bitmaps and Bitblts 641
Bitmap Basics 641
Where Do Bitmaps Come From? 642
Bitmap Dimensions 643
Color and Bitmaps 644
Real-World Devices 644
Bitmap Support in GDI 647
The Bit-Block Transfer 648
A Simple BitBlt 648
Stretching the Bitmap 652
The StretchBlt Mode 656
The Raster Operations 657
The Pattern Blt 659
The GDI Bitmap Object 662
Creating a DDB 662
The Bitmap Bits 665
The Memory Device Context 666
Loading Bitmap Resources 667
The Monochrome Bitmap Format 671
Brushes from Bitmaps 674
Drawing on Bitmaps 677
The Shadow Bitmap 682
Using Bitmaps in Menus 687
Nonrectangular Bitmap Images 701
Some Simple Animation 707
Bitmaps Outside the Window 711

Chapter 15 The Device-Independent Bitmap 723
The DIB File Format 724
The OS/2-Style DIB 725
Bottoms Up! 728
The DIB Pixel Bits 728
The Expanded Windows DIB 730
Reality Check 733
DIB Compression 734
Color Masking 737
The Version 4 Header 740
The Version 5 Header 744
Displaying DIB Information 746
Displaying and Printing 755
Digging into the DIB 755
Pixel to Pixel 758
The Topsy-Turvy World of DIBs 769
Sequential Display 777
Stretching to Fit 786
Color Conversion, Palettes, and Performance 797
The Union of DIBs and DDBs 799
Creating a DDB from a DIB 799
From DDB to DIB 808
The DIB Section 808
More DIB Section Differences 817
The File-Mapping Option 818
In Summary 820

Chapter 16 The Palette Manager 821
Using Palettes 821
Video Hardware 822
Displaying Gray Shades 823
The Palette Messages 831
The Palette Index Approach 832
Querying the Palette Support 836
The System Palette 837
Other Palette Functions 837
The Raster-Op Problem 838
Looking at the System Palette 839
Palette Animation 850
The Bouncing Ball 851
One-Entry Palette Animation 859
Engineering Applications 865
Palettes and Real-World Images 870
Palettes and Packed DIBs 870
The All-Purpose Palette 883
The Halftone Palette 890
Indexing Palette Colors 896
Palettes and Bitmap Objects 902
Palettes and DIB Sections 909
A Library for DIBs 915
The DIBSTRUCT Structure 917
The Information Functions 918
Reading and Writing Pixels 927
Creating and Converting 932
The DIBHELP Header File and Macros 946
The DIBBLE Program 949
Simple Palettes; Optimized Palettes 975
Converting Formats 991

Chapter 17 Text and Fonts 997
Simple Text Output 997
The Text Drawing Functions 997
Device Context Attributes for Text 1000
Using Stock Fonts 1002
Background on Fonts 1002
The Types of Fonts 1003
TrueType Fonts 1004
Attributes or Styles? 1005
The Point Size 1005
Leading and Spacing 1005
The Logical Inch Problem 1006
The Logical Font 1007
Logical Font Creation and Selection 1007
The PICKFONT Program 1009
The Logical Font Structure 1026
The Font-Mapping Algorithm 1030
Finding Out About the Font 1031
Character Sets and Unicode 1033
The EZFONT System 1035
Font Rotation 1044
Font Enumeration 1046
The Enumeration Functions 1046
The ChooseFont Dialog 1047
Paragraph Formatting 1057
Simple Text Formatting 1058
Working with Paragraphs 1059
Previewing Printer Output 1069
The Fun and Fancy Stuff 1082
The GDI Path 1082
Extended Pens 1083
Four Sample Programs 1088

Chapter 18 Metafiles 1097
The Old Metafile Format 1098
Simple Use of Memory Metafiles 1098
Storing Metafiles on Disk 1101
Old Metafiles and the Clipboard 1102
Enhanced Metafiles 1107
The Basic Procedure 1107
Looking Inside 1111
Metafiles and GDI Objects 1118
Metafiles and Bitmaps 1123
Enumerating the Metafile 1127
Embedding Images 1135
An Enhanced Metafile Viewer and Printer 1139
Displaying Accurate Metafile Images 1150
Scaling and Aspect Ratios 1161
Mapping Modes in Metafiles 1163
Mapping and Playing 1166

Section III Advanced Topics

Chapter 19 The Multiple-Document Interface 1173
MDI Concepts 1173
The Elements of MDI 1173
MDI Support 1175
A Sample MDI Implementation 1177
Three Menus 1190
Program Initialization 1191
Creating the Children 1192
More Frame Window Message Processing 1193
The Child Document Windows 1194
Cleaning Up 1196

Chapter 20 Multitasking and Multithreading 1197
Modes of Multitasking 1198
Multitasking Under DOS? 1198
Nonpreemptive Multitasking 1198
PM and the Serialized Message Queue 1200
The Multithreading Solution 1200
Multithreaded Architecture 1201
Thread Hassles 1202
The Windows Advantage 1202
New! Improved! Now with Threads! 1203
Windows Multithreading 1204
Random Rectangles Revisited 1205
The Programming Contest Problem 1208
The Multithreaded Solution 1216
Any Problems? 1226
The Benefits of Sleep 1226
Thread Synchronization 1227
The Critical Section 1227
Event Signaling 1229
The BIGJOB1 Program 1230
The Event Object 1235
Thread Local Storage 1240

Chapter 21 Dynamic-Link Libraries 1243
Library Basics 1243
Library: One Word, Many Meanings 1244
A Simple DLL 1245
The Library Entry and Exit Point 1248
The Test Program 1249
Shared Memory in DLLs 1252
The STRPROG Program 1258
Sharing Data Among STRPROG Instances 1264
Miscellaneous DLL Topics 1264
Dynamic Linking Without Imports 1265
Resource-Only Libraries 1266

Chapter 22 Sound and Music 1273
Windows and Multimedia 1273
Multimedia Hardware 1273
An API Overview 1274
Exploring MCI with TESTMCI 1275
MCITEXT and CD Audio 1280
Waveform Audio 1285
Sound and Waveforms 1285
Pulse Code Modulation 1286
The Sampling Rate 1287
The Sample Size 1287
Generating Sine Waves in Software 1288
A Digital Sound Recorder 1299
The MCI Alternative 1312
The MCI Command String Approach 1320
The Waveform Audio File Format 1325
Experimenting with Additive Synthesis 1326
Waking Up to Waveform Audio 1336
MIDI and Music 1345
The Workings of MIDI 1345
The Program Change 1347
The MIDI Channel 1347
MIDI Messages 1349
An Introduction to MIDI Sequencing 1351
Playing a MIDI Synthesizer from the PC Keyboard 1357
A MIDI Drum Machine 1375
The Multimedia time Functions 1399
RIFF File I/O 1402

Chapter 23 A Taste of the Internet 1405
Windows Sockets 1405
Sockets and TCP/IP 1406
Network Time Services 1406
The NETTIME Program 1407
WinInet and FTP 1421
Overview of the FTP API 1421
The Update Demo 1423

Index 1437

……
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  • Nobody 2016年04月07日

    虽说是13##页,其实至少有3##页是原码——不过也可见用win api编程是件多么困难的事,特别是GUI编程。 最难的是开头,对api参数的理解。如果C语言没学好,或者忘得不多(像我)了就更难理解了。很多入门级书会将数据定义与结构体等内容略略带过,恰恰这些都是头文件常用的。果然学东西只能看厚的书......

  • 伊卡洛斯 2016年01月08日

    咋说呢,里面的东西虽然很有用,虽然书很厚 但是但是......现在计算机时代已经不一样了 有关网络编程的东西实在太少太少了,并行编程、底层调用什么的只能去看HACK书籍 介绍那么多的函数现在已经不需要用的,也没有什么学习必要,大概说说再给个MSDN或者KB就OK的事情,那么多的文字介绍Brush,MDI...重要的是不够细,要不然就说的像Windows Internal一样给了要点,自己找答案,您这手把手的做完了还是很不爽~ 我很关心的线程自主............

  • gentoo 2015年12月22日

    不管到什么时候,只要你学习Windows平台的编程,这本书都是必读的。分上下册,精华在上册。只要看完上册,基本的编程概念就熟悉了。 我来说说这本书的缺点: 第一、中文版的书中有太多的错误,这些错误在英文版中是没有的。我在第一遍看的时候非常头疼,后来对照网上的勘误表,发现原来是书中印错了。太恼火。 第二、书中关于一些代码的解释不容易懂。代码是为了演示书中的内容而作,但对于代码的一些关键细节,如果作者更详细地............

  • DinoStray 2015年05月29日

    windows API 编程中,为了方便程序猿理解类型的含义,往往同一个类型起无限多个别名,可能这些名字老外理解起来比较easy,可非英语语系的人难免对其中的部分名称理解困难。 这本书几乎解答了我常见的别名、函数的命名由来,绝对堪称对英文名不弄懂不舒服斯基人的福音啊。 可能也只有真的参与编写windows代码的人,才对这些名字的由来了若指掌吧......

  • 涅瓦纳 2014年11月16日

    我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了 我看过了......

  • 木木 2014年09月19日

    对于书中的内容。这本书写得很细,可以帮助你理解很多Windows编程的基本概念,花了一个多月的时间也才读了不到一半,但是受益匪浅,以前听到“句柄”(Handle),设备上下文(Device Context)之类的只有个朦胧的意识,很不理解,书中对这些概念都做了详细的介绍。我觉得这是一本打基础的书,你可以透过它来理解微软的编程哲学(可能会被Linuxer 嘲笑)。 对于书的翻译。由于书是很多人合译的,在翻译上有时会出现相同的英文............

  • haitao 2014年06月06日

    在Windows程序开发过程中,你可能不会直接调用Windows API,而是利用各种框架来进行开发,比如MFC, .NET等等。这些框架给你带来便利与效率的同时,也可能会因为对你屏蔽了底层的细节而使你对某些问题一头雾水。 不管你使用什么框架,了解Windows开发的基础知识以及与Windows打交道的基本方式都是必要的。这会解释您的许多疑惑,并且让您少走弯路。 如果想了解这些知识,CharlesPetzold的这本Programming Windows (Fifth Edition)乃............

  • 汪明 2013年07月15日

    作者写这本书的第一版的时候是1988年,那个时候微软才发布windows的2.0版本,这个系统也刚刚被人们认识不久,要想在windows下开发自己的程序,资料这么少,难度可想而知。 这本书得出现迎合了人们的这种欲望,读者们发现这本书讲的界面程序的开发不需要太多底层的知识,很容易读懂;更重要的是,书中讲解了界面程序开发的各个方面,包罗万物,而且在讲到某一方面的知识时并不需要和其他方面扯上太多关系,也就是说各个部分............

  • colaghost 2012年08月17日

    对得起经典两个字,在整本书的引导下清楚了整个WINODWS的消息处理机制,对windows程序设计也算是有比较深的了解,当然只是在API层面上,至于像MFC、COM这些就得另外找书了。 这两本书不仅仅是在讲解API的用法而已,更重要的是讲解了WINDOWS的整个体制,把它的整个内部消息体制完整地展现在你的眼前,而不会有别的让你模糊的概念。 其实现在很少人会老老实实地直接学WINDOWS程序设计,像MFC啊.NET这些可能更来得简单些,但是基于框............

  • freelsen 2012年04月13日

    关于翻译: 比之前的版本的翻译有了进步。 比如我手里有个电子版的中文版,不知道是谁翻译的,效果极,例如将指针翻译成指标,将call翻译成呼叫。。句子更不顺。所以与它比较起来,此版好多了。 但是因为每章翻译人员不一样,我还没有全部读,所以不能全面肯定。 第一章,翻译的风格是对原文意思有了一点改变,增加了一些中文化的词,比如“要说。。。”,“也就是。。”,原文并没有这个意思。 关于内容: Charles Petzold的这............

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